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I'm trying to make a local CA in node, and I'm using node-forge for it. I was using openssl before and it was working.

I'm pointing certain domains to my web server and it automatically creates a certificate for the domain through which it's being visited.

import forge from 'node-forge';
import { readFile, writeFile } from 'fs/promises';
import https from 'https';
import tls  from 'tls';

const pki = forge.pki;
forge.options.usePureJavaScript = true;

var ca;

async function create_ca () {
    // Create the certificate for the Certificate Authority

    let keys = pki.rsa.generateKeyPair(2048);
    let skey = keys.privateKey;

    let cert = pki.createCertificate();
    cert.publicKey = keys.publicKey;
    cert.serialNumber = '01';
    cert.validity.notBefore = new Date();
    cert.validity.notAfter = new Date();
    cert.validity.notAfter.setFullYear(
        cert.validity.notBefore.getFullYear()+1
    );

    let attrs = [
         {name:'commonName',value:'devca.com'}
        ,{name:'countryName',value:'US'}
        ,{shortName:'ST',value:'Virginia'}
        ,{name:'localityName',value:'Blacksburg'}
        ,{name:'organizationName',value:'Dev CA'}
        ,{shortName:'OU',value:'Local Certificate Authority'}
        ,{name:'emailAddress',value:'ca@devca.com'}
    ];

    cert.setSubject(attrs);
    cert.setIssuer(attrs);

    /*
        basicConstraints=CA:TRUE
        subjectKeyIdentifier=hash
        authorityKeyIdentifier=keyid,issuer
    */
    cert.setExtensions([
        {name:'basicConstraints',cA:true},
        {name:'subjectKeyIdentifier'},
        {name:'authorityKeyIdentifier'},
    ]);

    cert.sign(skey);

    try {
        await writeFile(cert_path, pki.certificateToPem(cert));
        await writeFile(key_path, pki.privateKeyToPem(skey));
    } catch (e) {
        console.error('Could not write Certificate Authority files: ', e);
    }

    ca {
        key: skey,
        cert: cert,
    };
}


async function create (domain) {
    // Based from:
    // https://stackoverflow.com/questions/51955695

    let cert = pki.createCertificate();
    cert.publicKey = ca.cert.publicKey;
    cert.serialNumber = '01';
    cert.validity.notBefore = new Date();
    cert.validity.notAfter = new Date();
    cert.validity.notAfter.setFullYear(
        cert.validity.notBefore.getFullYear()+1
    );

    let attrs = [
         {name:'commonName',value:domain}
        ,{name:'countryName',value:'US'}
        ,{shortName:'ST',value:'Virginia'}
        ,{name:'localityName',value:'Blacksburg'}
        ,{name:'organizationName',value:'End Point'}
        ,{shortName:'OU',value:'Certificate Authority'}
    ];

    cert.setSubject(attrs);
    cert.setIssuer(ca.cert.subject.attributes);

    // I'm using 2 here because it seemed to be the same result as OpenSSL's.
    // type 6 puts an 'URI:' prefix which made it different
    cert.setExtensions([{
        name: 'subjectAltName',
        altNames: [
            // type: 6 = URI, but doesn't work
            // type: 2 = ???, but works
            {type:2,value: domain },
            {type:2,value: 'www.' + domain },
            {type:2,value: '*.' + domain },
        ]
    }]);

    cert.sign(ca.key);

    console.log(pki.certificateToPem(cert));

    // This is stored as pem, as the only user of this is the https server.
    return {
        key: pki.privateKeyToPem(ca.key),
        cert: pki.certificateToPem(cert),
    };
}


// Not the actual webserver, but it goes along these lines
function create_server () {
    function process_request (req, res) {}

    let cert = await create(domain);
    let options = {
        SNICallback: async (domain, cb) => {
            let cert = await create(domain);
            let ctx = tls.createSecureContext(cert);

            cb(null, ctx);
        },
        key: cert.key,
        cert: cert.cert,
    };

    return https.createServer(options, () => {});
}

After having added the CA to chrome, I open the domains, but chrome will keep rejecting the certificate with NET::ERR_CERT_INVALID.

I've been trying to see the differences between a previously created certificate by OpenSSL and the new one created by node-forge. The diferences seemed to be only the subjectAltNames, where they would all have an URI: prefix, so I fixed that by using type 2 instead. But still didn't work.

My next guess was the serial number, maybe chrome blocks such a small serial number because it's not realistic, but i've been trying for a while to generate a good serial number without success.

I don't know though if that's still the problem, or if there's anything else I'm missing.

NOTE: This is a simplified version of my code. It's not really what I'm using, and I haven't tested this exact version of the code. It should be very similar though. Except for the server creation, the other two functions are almost untouched.

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